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Posts Tagged ‘grapes’

One of the things I love about the Prophet Joel is that he really goes along with the idea of “Prophecy in the Kitchen” – despite the terrible locust plague that was afflicting the land at that time, despite the terrible damage it did to the crops (see Dried Fruit and Spice Muffins,) he still delivers the message that if we return to God and have faith, anything is possible – even divine prophecy.

“Be not afraid, ye beasts of the field; for the pastures of the wilderness do spring, for the tree beareth its fruit, the fig-tree and the vine do yield their strength.” (Joel 2:22)

I think that in the above verse is an allegory that’s about more than just figs and vines, it’s saying that no matter how many times the Israelites turn from God, their roots are strong, that there is always room for return. That no matter how far they stray, it’s their roots that will bring them back to God again.

And indeed, in the first verse of Chapter 3, the prophet states (echoing Numbers 11:26-29):

“And it shall come to pass afterward, that I will pour out My spirit upon all flesh; and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, your old men shall dream dreams, your young men shall see visions. And also upon the servants and upon the handmaids in those days will I pour out My spirit.” (Joel 3:1-2)

Of course, it is hard for me to live in Israel during these difficult times and to not find comfort in these words. The People of Israel have deep roots in the Land of Israel, and whether it be locusts or rockets that rain down upon us, our figs and vines will prosper because our roots are deep. And it doesn’t take a prophet to be able to tell us that – we are all prophets in these times and the only vision we have is of a brighter, more peaceful future, one in which figs and vines will prosper all across the Middle East and there will be an end to all this war.

The roots of flavor in this Fig and Port Wine Chocolate Salami are very deep and decadent – comfort food for difficult times.

Salami 27

Chocolate Salami with Port Wine and Figs

12 ozs chocolate
6 Tbsp. butter/margarine
1/3 cup sugar
1 shot espresso
3 Tbsp. port wine
1 sleeve of petit buerre cookies, crushed coarsely
1/2 cup shelled whole pistachios
1/2 cup chopped dried figs
1/4 cup cocoa powder

1/4 cup powdered sugar for dusting

Melt chocolate with butter or margarine. Add sugar, espresso and port wine.

Salami 6 Salami 7 Salami 8

 

Crush petit buerre cookies, chop figs. Add whole pistachios, chopped figs and crushed cookies to chocolate mixture, mix well, using the back of the spoon to crush the mixture even more and combine it well – you should not be able to see the color of the cookies. Add cocoa powder (this will help the whole mixture stiffen up a bit.) Mix well.

Salami 9 Salami 1 Salami 29 Salami 10

Spoon out half of the mixture onto a baking sheet, use your hands to shape into a messy loaf shape, then use parchment paper to shape into a log. Unroll paper and move the log onto the edge of the parchment paper sheet, then roll up and twist the ends as you would a toffee or hard-candy.

Salami 2

Place in refrigerator to cool for 3-4 hours. Before serving, unroll the log from the parchment paper and dust with 1/4 cup of powdered sugar. Roll log in powdered sugar until the sugar enters all the crevices of the log and it is completely covered.

Salami 3

Slice into 1/8-1/4 inch thick slices and serve!

Keep refrigerated.

Salami 17

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“And it will be, when the Lord, your God, brings you to the land He swore to your fathers, to Abraham, to Isaac and to Jacob, to give you, great and good cities that you did not build, and houses full of all good things that you did not fill, and hewn cisterns that you did not hew, vineyards and olive trees that you did not plant, and you will eat and be satisfied.” (Deuteronomy 6:10–11)

Questions: What warning is Moses trying to give the Israelites here? What is he afraid of? Why this list of things that were not done? And why will they eat and be satisfied anyway? How important is it to have faith?

Ideas: Serve grapes, grape jam/jello, grape juice or good wine, olives, olive oil, or an olive spread.

Olives wine

 

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‘When you reap the harvest of your land, you shall not completely reap the corner of your field, and you shall not gather the fallen stalks of your harvest. You shall not pick the small, incompletely formed bunches of grapes of your vineyard or the fallen grapes of your vineyard; you shall leave them for the poor and for the stranger: I am the Lord your God.’ (Leviticus 19:10)

Questions: Why is giving “leftovers” to the poor a charitable deed? Why are we not commanded to give the best of our crops and food to the poor? And isn’t it obvious that we must be charitable to those less fortunate than us? Why must God tell us this? And why isn’t it enough to just tell us to be charitable and not to tell us exactly how to do it?

Ideas: Serve an abundance of grapes – take all the grapes off of their stems except for one cluster. Serve raisins or grapes on a square plate and leave one corner empty. You can really do this for effect with everything you serve – leave one corner of the brownie tray “unharvested,” don’t eat the last slice of meatloaf, etc.

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